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Find Books from Various Publishers at Live Roots. She was a medium- sized, full-formed brunette, of perhaps forty years of age ; yet so perfect was her physical organization, and so well regulated her moral nature, so even, calm, and blameless had been the tenor of her life, that now, she was a specimen not, certainly, of youthful beauty but of a rarer kind of matured and perfected matronly beauty.

Her style was noble and simple. Her rich, abundant hair of glossy black, with purplish light, was plainly di vided above a broad forehead, and laying down upon the temples in heavy looped bands, was carried be- hind and twisted into a thick, rich coil, and wound round and round into a large knot fastened with pins; there were no combs, curls, ribbons, or fripperies of any sort, to mar the simple, grand beauty of the head.

The eye- brows were black and lightly arched; the eyes large, dark, and very quiet, under their curtain of long black lashes; the nose perfectly straight; and the cheeks, lips, and chin, perfectly beautiful in contour.

Her dress was very simple a black silk with a delicate lace collar pinned with a small diamond brooch. She sat in an easy chair, reading a letter ; and as she read and turned the leaves a quiet smile would just dawn and play on her lips.

By her side was a stand with an open book, a workbox, and a little silver handrbell. At last, without removing her eyes from the letter, she smilingly extended her hand, and rang the little bell.

A servant entered, and still without withdrawing her eyes from the fascinating letter, she said : " Send Mrs. Jolly to me, William. Slowly and smilingly folding up the letter, she said, "Mr.

Sutherland is coming home this evening. He brings a friend, a young gentleman, with him. I wish you to have their chambers prepared ; and do remem- ber to close the wire-gauze blinds, and burn catalpa leaves in the rooms, to- destroy any mosquitoes that may remain.

You must judge of that. Suther- land may arrive at any time between this and ten o'clock. Sure no mother ever had a son like 70 INDIA.

THE PEAKL OF PEARL RIVER. Comes to me first comes to me before hasten- ing to see his lady-love his adored India.

Dearest Mark but his devotion shall be rewarded. He shall find his India here. DEAR INDIA : My dear niece, but dearer daughter, just get into your carriage, and come to me, and do not pause to wonder why I ask you.

It is late, I know, but the moon shines brightly, and the roads are good your driver is careful, and the distance is short.

More than all, dear daughter, I consider your coming very important. So hasten, darling, to Your affectionate aunt and mother, HELEN B. Having sealed this letter, the lady rang the bell and gave it in charge of a footman, urging dispatch.

Soon a waiter entered, and lighted up the rooms ; and he had scarcely closed the blinds and withdrawn, before the sound of carriage-wheels was heard ap- proaching, and the lady hastened out into the hall.

The carriage paused before the door, and in an instant after, Mark Sutherland had alighted, and was clasped to the bosom of his mother.

I am so overjoyed to have you again 1" " Dear mother, I am so proud and happy to find you looking so well! Permit me to present my friend Mr.

Lincoln Lauderdale Mrs. Sutherland offered her hand, saying " I am very glad to see you, Mr. You are not a stranger, I assure you. My son has taught rne to esteem you, and desire your friendship.

Will you enter now? Sutherland remained in the hall to give some directions to the grooms, and to order the baggage of his guest to be taken up to his chamber.

After which he entered the parlour, and laying his hand affectionately upon his friend's shoulder, said " My dear Lauderdale, when you feel disposed or, rather, if you feel disposed to change your dress Flamingo will show you your apartment.

Supper will be ready Madame, when will supper be ready? Show Mr. Lauderdale to his room, and consider yourself in his exclusive ser- vice while he honours us with his company.

I pre- sume you will prefer Flame, my dear Lincoln, because you already know the fellow. When you have been subjected to the enervating influence of this climate for a week, you will better know what you need.

THE PEARL OK PEAKL 1UVE1J. By this time Flamingo made bis appearance with chamber lamps. Lauderdale arose to follow him. Sutherland accompanied him into the hall.

Sutherland was your own mother? Besides, my friend, pardon me! We are said to be the image of each other! You should see India.

And, more than that, she my mother, I mean is the most excellent, except none. Here is your room. Make Flame supply you with anything you may need, that is not at hand ; and for your lii'e nay, more, for your good looks, worth more than lil'e do not open the wire shutters ; if you do, you may look in the glass in ten minutes after, and fancy your- self ill with the erysipelas.

Au revoirf When you are ready, come down. You have been ill, and never let me know it. What can it be, Mark? I have had a long, fatiguing ride, and I have not heard from India for more than a week.

How is my Pearl? Is that the cause of those haggard looks? And yet, to come to me first! Dear Mark! But I have anticipated all your wishes.

Your India will be here to meet you I am expecting her every moment. Vivian, I suppose. Listen, Mark! I will carry her off to a dressing-room, and leave you to meet India.

She does not know that you are here. Sutherland went to the hall door, which she reached just as Mrs. Vivian, who was the first to alight, entered.

I am very glad to see you! Come, come into my room. Mark will wait for her. THE FEAKL OF PEAUL RIVER. India sauntered languidly up the door-stairs.

Mark sprang forward to meet her. She started paled reeled might have fallen, but he caught her to his bosom, murmuring deeply, earnestly, "India! He followed her, placed an easy chair, seated her on it, rolled a cushion to her feet, untied and removed her bonnet, lifted the mass of shining amber ringlets and pressed them to his face, and then would have sunk down upon the cushion at her feet there to sit and worship with his eyes her peerless beauty, only the sound of light footsteps and silvery laughter arrested the folly.

It was Valeria, who, chatting and laughing with her usual gaiety, entered, accompanied by Mrs. Suther- land.

Their entrance was soon followed by that of Mr. Lauderdale, who was immediately presented to Mrs. Vivian and Miss Sutherland.

Supper was next announced, and the party left the drawing-room. After supper, the evening was spent in music, conversation, and cards.

A storm arising. After the party had MRS. I did not require you to be taken captive. What would you do, then?

That is extremely cool, upon my sacred word and honour! I thought they were black; but, in truth, one cannot follow their quickly-changing light and shade to find the hue, they scintillate and flash so.

Why, they are calm and steady as stars. What the deuce are her eyes to you? Hers is bronze in the shade, and golden in the sunlight.

D 1 fly away with you! So you think Mrs. Vivian good-looking? When he thought me praising his love with great fervour, he was so jealous as to feel like running me through the heart ; and now that he finds me very moderate in my admi- ration of his idol, he is angry enough to sweep my head off at a blow," said Lauderdale, laughing.

But she has not disturbed the healthful action of mine will that con- tent you? Her son had just revealed to her his purpose of emanci- pating all the negroes upon his plantation and sending them to Liberia, with his reasons for so doing.

The scene took place very early in the morning after his arrival. It was in her dressing-room. Before any of their guests had arisen, they were up, and she had called him, as he passed her door.

They sat now at the open window that looked out upon the beautiful valley of the Pearl, with its groves and fields and streams all fresh and resplendent in the light of the newly-risen sun.

The mother sighed deeply as she withdrew her glance from the gladdening scene, and fixed it upon the face of her sou.

If a little while before she had restrained unmeet energy of expression in the strong emotion she had felt, now all power as well as all will seemed to forsake her.

THE PEARL OF PEARL RIVER eyes fixed upon them. Sutherland watched her anxiously. Not even India, my loved India, shall cause me to forget all I owe to you.

This project of yours will reduce me to beggary I" " No, dear madam, it shall not. Me it will reduce to my own exertions for a livelihood, but not you.

When all my slaves are freed, and on their way to Africa at my cost, there will still remain, from the sale of the land, some thirty thousand dollars.

That money, mother, with the homestead here, I intend to settle upon yourself" " Oh, rny son! Do you think, then, that I will suffer you to beggar yourself to en- rich me?

No, dear Mark ; no! Since you do not forget me since you remember me with affectionate interest, it is sufficient. If I reproached you just now, MK.

How could I? I had settled the plan I have named to you, in my mind, before I left the North. Sutherland looked down, mortified and troubled.

Under no circumstances can I consent that you beggar yourself for me. I shall go to the West. It is a broad field for enterprise.

I studied law for my amusement, having had a strong natural attraction for it; I shall commence the practice of that profession in some western village, and grow up with the town.

I shall succeed. Indeed, methinks new life and energy runs through my veins and fires my heart at the very thought of difficulties to meet and overcome!

Sutherland, smiling gaily, stretching his arms and rubbing his hands together "Alas! What a project! And your approach- ing marriage with India is it possible in this con- nexion that you do not think of that?

Sutherland, as a strange, beautiful smile flitted over his face. THE PEARL OF PEARL RIVEK. My India! I know her generosity, her magna- nimity, her high-souled enthusiasm!

How many times I have experienced it! How many times, when reading with her of some high heroism of the olden time, when there were heroes, have I seen her pause, her bosom heave, her cheek flush, her eye kindle and gaze upon me, expressing unspeakable admiration of those lofty deeds!

And now, when in her own life an opportunity occurs of practising those very same greajLvirtues when she has the power, by sacrificing wealth and luxury, to bless hundreds of her fellow- beings, and not them only, but their children and children's children do I not know that high-souled girl will aspire to do it!

Madam, it is a majestic, a godlike power, to be able to confer the blessing of liberty and education upon hundreds of beings and their descendants to numberless generations a power I would not now exchange for a small limited mo- narchy.

And, oh! Nay, do I not know that she will go beyond me? Mother, when I have doubted, or struggled against my better feelings, I have seen as in a vision, her eyes suffused with generous tears, her cheek kin- dle, and felt the warm pressure of her hand encour- aging, inspiring me!

And even should India approve your project, which I think quite impossible, what is your further purpose?

No, I mean to take her with me to the West, to encourage and assist me while I make her as happy as I possibly can! That does not mean wedded to ease and worldly honour; indeed, it more fre- quently means the loss of both.

If you were a European talking of Europeans, I could understand your prudence; but you are an American matron talking to an American youth, and advising him not to marry the girl he loves if he has not a fur- tune to support her.

It seems to me, mother, that in our country the man or woman who refuses to marry for such a reason, wants faith, love, hope, enterprise, energy, and every thing they ought to have ; and under such circumstances, it seems but right, indeed, that they should stay single.

But should India be so imprudent, do you think her father will consent to such a mad project? I know how young people think of poverty, and talk of poverty, when any strong motive like love, or any other passion, urges them to embrace it ; and people who are older, and should know better, talk pretty much in the same way.

They will tell you that poverty deprives you of none of the real essential blessings of life ; that the riches of nature and of nature's God are free alike to the rich and the poor; that the blessings of health, of well-doing, of sunshine, and the face of nature, are open alike to both.

It is so with the rich, doubtless, and it may be so with the poor who were born in this poverty ; but to the well-born and well-educated, to the refined and intellectual, poverty is a dreadful, , dreadful thing.

It is not only to suffer the privation of proper and sufficient food, and comfortable clothing, and dwelling it is to be shut out of all enjoyment of the blessings of nature and of society, and at the s;une time be exposed to all the evils that nature and society can inflict upon you.

You have no leisure, or if you have, you have no respectable clothing, in which to go out and take the air, and enjoy the genial sunshine of pleasant days, on the one hand ; and on the other, no adequate protection against the freezing MRS.

And for society, pride will not permit you to seek the company of your sometime peers, and delicacy restrains you from the coarse association around you.

To us, Mark, poverty would be the pri- vation of every enjoyment. And loss of fortune has now no terrors for me ; and birth and education, so far from rendering me more helpless, shall make me stronger to conquer my difficulties.

I have no fear of wanting any of the comforts of life from the very onset. And as for being shut out, or rather shut in, from nature mother, do you think I shall be?

Do you think I shall keep away from nature because I cannot call on her in a coach, with a groom on horseback to take in my card?

No, in- deed. On the contrary, I purpose to live with nature. She's an old intimate friend of mine, and no summer friend either nor shall I be a summer friend of hers, and shrink from her boisterous winds and rattling sleet.

And as for society, mother oh, let me quote to you the words of Dr. Channing, whose lips, indeed, seemed touched with fire: 'No matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter my obscure dwelling.

If the Sacred Writers will enter and take up their abode under my roof, if Milton will cross my threshold to sing to me of paradise, and Shakspeare to open to me the worlds of imagination and the workings of the human heart, and Franklin to enrich me with his practical wisdom, I shall not pine for want of intellectual companionship.

You would not bring Miss Sutherland down to such a state? Just now, when I told you of the nameless miseries of the well-born poor, you did not deny them, but said.

India Miss Sutherland ' is a lady? Are you not selfish? Then he laughed softly and entered the house again himself, walking down a long corridor toward the cooking area.

An oven half buried in the earth was sending up tendrils of smoke, which swirled about the dried onions and vegetables hanging from the ceiling.

On one side of the room a woman was slicing vegetables with a knife, her back to Hazil. He threw his arms around her full figure, laughing when she shrieked.

No sooner had she turned than he planted a kiss on her mouth, shutting off her objections, then stepped back and plucked a piece of roasted meat from a dish on the table.

Although she was no longer in the flush of youth, her thin face was still attractive. He chewed it, then reached for another before answering.

With grape juice running over his chin, he grinned. Mahita laughed softly and feigned annoyance. What is it? After all, his future son-in-law is here.

You think Hanna will have this one? Without hesitation she nodded. These two were well aware of the innermost secrets of the house of Garai, as were all the servants.

Their master and his family labored under the delusion that the servants were all deaf. Even if they had tried to maintain some secrecy, the houses of Ur provided precious little privacy.

There were no doors to close, only openings between each room, which were occasionally covered with blankets or animal skins, but most of the time Garai and his wife, Rufi, lived in full view of servants and visitors alike.

Mahita looked around and gave a sigh of satisfaction. Picking up a clay jar, she poured some wine into a clay goblet and offered it to Hazil.

She then poured herself some and sat down with another sigh. She should have been married two or three years ago.

And yet she still awaits a marriage offer. What about old Rashim? She got rid of him fast enough. Hazil wrapped his arms around Mahita, kissing her soundly.

You know how Garai will yell. Sarai moved over toward the stone tub, slipped out of her robe, and stepped in. Naruto — Episode: Byakugan vs Kage bunshin!

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It was a pleasure to comb it, and now Zulda said, You want me to tie your hair up? Sarai moved over toward the stone tub, slipped out of her robe, and stepped in.

With a sigh of pleasure, she slid down into the water. Sarai hummed to herself, enjoying the coolness of the water, and finally she got up and allowed Zulda to dry her off.

Zulda rubbed a soft, sweet-smelling oil into her body, all the time chattering away. Your brother will spoil you. She began to rub herself down with a soft cloth, then stepped into the undergarments Zulda held for her.

Her gown was pure white and, in the fashion of the aristocracy, was suspended by one strap over her right shoulder. She waited until Zulda fastened a belt studded with stones around her waist, then slipped into her sandals.

Sarai loosened her hair and let it fall down her back, staring into the polished bronze mirror on the wall. It was amusing to watch him come sniffing around.

The blurry image staring back from the mirror revealed a tall, proud woman, with a prominent nose, high cheekbones that accented the hollows of her cheeks, and black eyes with strange green flecks in them.

Being from the privileged class, and having been successful in business, they owned homes both in Ur and in the smaller, but also impressive, city of Uruk.

The entire household would travel upriver with Garai and stay in their other house whenever he had business to attend to.

What will your brother say? Her enormous eyes, almond shaped and deep set, now sparkled with amusement. She loved to tease Zulda, for the girl was easily fooled.

Why do I have to get married? Sitting down at a dressing table filled with cosmetics, Sarai put the tip of her finger into a small jar carved out of semiprecious stone.

She pressed the contents of it to her cheek and began spreading it on. What else is there for a woman to do? Why, nothing much. Zulda stared at Sarai with astonishment.

But fathers choose husbands for girls! And since your father is gone, your brother will choose your husband. Zulda took in a short breath.

She was shocked but intrigued. Nobody but you would say that, mistress. Sarai paused from putting on the cosmetics and thought for a moment.

Why, he was so old he would have died on the marriage bed. What will your husband be like? Her eyes flashed with indignation.

Most men can only talk about business. The man I marry must have a broad knowledge of life…and most of all, he must know that women are equal to men.

If you see a good-looking, strong young fellow for sale, let me know about it. Sarai laughed and rose, moving swiftly and gracefully toward the doorway.

The family was gathered in the dining room with Garai, the head of the house, who paced about impatiently. He was a small man with sharp, light brown eyes and well-kept brown hair.

His wife, Rufi, watched him moving back and forth nervously. She was a pretty woman, a few years younger than her husband, and she kept glancing at the door, waiting for Sarai to enter.

Zaroni, the mother of Garai and Sarai, stood calmly next to her daughter-in-law. She was a small woman with greenish eyes, and traces of her youthful beauty still remained.

Sarai will be here soon. She stayed very close to Eliphaz, as if he were apt to run away, and now she smiled at him flatteringly.

I had them fix your favorite foods for supper. Thank you, Mother. She watched as Sarai walked over to Eliphaz, smiled warmly, and said, How well you look, my dear Eliphaz.

It suits you splendidly. Sarai reached out and fingered the robe, feeling its texture with an admiring glance. She then touched his cheek lightly and leaned against him.

Come along! Sarai smiled blandly as her mother came to her side and whispered, Why do you torment your sister so?

She was not angry, however, but simply shook her head in a mild reproof. Two young servant girls served the meal, while Mahita oversaw them with a sharp eye.

They carried in flat metal plates filled with wild roast duck, goat, boiled eggs, leeks, and cucumbers, and poured wine from metal flagons. Yes, it has, Eliphaz said, nodding eagerly.

It should go where the old road was. Garai threw his head back and glared at his sister. Her mother watched the exchange, well aware that this would not be the end of the matter.

Sarai will find some way to get even with Hanna for that comment , Zaroni thought. She always does. After the meal Sarai smiled slightly and went directly to Eliphaz, taking him by the arm and pulling at him gently.

Come along, I must show you my garden…and you must tell me about your trip. Eliphaz stared at her, unable to speak.

Her beauty was enough to stop most men in their tracks, and he allowed himself to be led out of the dining room.

As the two disappeared, Hanna threw herself into a chair and began to cry. Her mother went right to her, putting her arm around her older daughter.

She does this only to stir you up. Just laugh at her, Hanna. Zaroni shook her head. It will be all right. Like most men of his age, Southey pinned his faith to the past; and he carried all the fervor and positiveness of his ardent temperament into his defense of the established institutions of England.

Strong conservative opinions, not to say prejudices, are hardly the best equipment for a writer who would carry a message to future generations.

From both the prose and the poetry of Southey posterity, as Byron prophesied, has selected, and somewhat ruthlessly. His poetry, collected by its author in ten volumes, has not 1.

Ode Written during the Negotiations with Bonaparte in January, Introduction 13 since been gathered together in a complete edition, and is best judged by Professor Dowden's single volume of well-chosen selections.

This contains the shorter pieces and extracts from the fo-ur long narrative poems, Thalaha the Destroyer , Madoc , The Curse of Kehama and Roderick The Holly Tree and the charming lines My Days Among the Dead Are Past are well known; while the direct simplicity of The Battle of Blenheim and The Inchcape Rock make them more than children's classics.

The bulk of Southey's work, and in many respects the best of it, is in prose. Yet, by a fate similar to that of his poetry, his prose is kept in memory chiefly by a short and rapidly written biography, rather than, as he wished and confidently expected, by the solid volumes of his History of Brazil and History of the Peninsular War His History of Portugal, of which the Brazil was but an off-shoot, and which was to include an account of the Portuguese colonies, of the monastic orders, and of the literatures of Portugal and 1.

Thackeray's Four Georges, George lY. Fortunately, the Life of Nelson, limited in scope, in- spiring in theme, and outside the field of political con- troversy, where Southey was prone to narrowness and dogmatism, represents his best qualities as a student and writer.

In its first form a long article published in the Quarterly Review in , it was expanded for sepa- rate publication in The book was finished in Feb- ruary of that year.

Chief among these is its generally recognized excellence of style. Some of the judgments expressed on this point are worth stopping over, as a means of helping us not only to a better appreciation of Southey, but also, per- haps, to a better understanding of the qualities of good prose.

In a review of Southey 's Colloquies on Society — a review, it may be said in passing, which displays some of the faults of style and temper from which Southey 's prose is free— his younger contemporary Macaulay pays tribute to the ''beauty and purity" of Southey's Eng- lish, so charming, he confesses, that ''even when he writes nonsense, we generally read it with pleasure.

Life and Correspondence, p. I Introduction 15 more moderate. He finds Southey's style ''admirably suited to the level character of his writing and the humbler choice of themes; let a subject arise in which a higher tone is required, of splendid declamation, and it will soon betray its want of the loftier qualities.

His aims, according to his own statement, are more pedestrian, — "To say what you have to say as perspicuously as possible, as briefly as possible, and as remember ably as possible, not omitting the little circum- stances which give life to narration, and bring old man- ners, old feelings, and old times before the eyes.

Since Southey 's time many docu- ments have been published, discoveries made, contro- versies waged, and much new light thrown on the public and private episodes of Nelson's life.

One cannot, it is said, see the mountain near at hand ; nor is a contempo- rary, least of all a scholar among the documents of his library, best equipped to depict the stirring events in a great naval warrior's career.

But if there are difficulties, there are also advantages in the contemporary point of view. Southey had lived through the momentous events of the Napoleonic wars; 1.

Literary Reminiscences, chapter on Wordsivortli and Southey. More than this, he could convey to us the love and veneration in which Nelson was held by men of his own time.

When Southey wrote his biography. Nelson had been dead eight years. Several lives had been written, and Clarke and M 'Arthur had published their collection of Nelson's reports and correspondence.

The faults of this latter collection Southey had called attention to in his Quarterly article of ; and of Harrison's Life of Nelson, on which he is said to have placed undue reliance, he had remarked that its author was chosen by Lady Hamilton's friends as ''one who would under- take to justify the only culpable parts of Nelson's con- duct.

Fairness of temper and soundness of judg- ment are even more essential qualities in biographical writing than strict accuracy of detail.

Southey was master of such materials as were then available, and he was a careful and conscientious workman, skilled by long practice in weighing conflicting authorities and sifting Introduction 17 large masses of evidence.

Moreover, he was familiar with life in the navy. His brother, Thomas Southey, with whom he kept up a steady correspondence, had been a midshipman in the Bellona at the time of Nel- son's last Mediterranean campaign, and had risen to the rank of captain in the service.

Southey speaks also of a visit from a Captain Guillem, Nelson's first lieuten- ant at Trafalgar, who had served before the mast and fought at Copenhagen, and who, as Southey said, "told us more of Nelson than I can find time to write.

In no small measure Southey is responsible for the popular conception of Nelson. If he has erred in the picture he has given us, the fault lies, not so much in a pardonable and even justifiable glorification of his hero 's achievements, as in laying more stress on his spectacular qualities of coolness and daring in actual battle than on the untiring foresight, attention to laborious detail, tact and policy in dealing with superiors and subordi- nates, and mastery of the science of his profession, which were equally a part of his genius and elements in his success.

The thorough study which has since been de- voted to every phase of Nelson's professional career has brought out these qualities with increasing clearness.

Sailor fashion, he was, as his letters show, a bit given to grumbling, and to criticism of his superior officers and the shore administration.

His professional ethics, tested for instance by his attitude toward the perennial evil of personal favor or "pulf in matters of promo- tion and the like, seem not to have been in advance of his age.

Ever eager to reward his officers for merit or distinguished service, he was equally ready to push into a captaincy a step-son whose unfitness he must have known at the time.

In matters of discipline, he was likely to be guided by his feelings rather than by strict equity, and it may even be suggested that in some instances his judgments savored of humor or caprice.

As a case in point may be taken his decision to send Sir Robert C alder home for court martial in a gun ship instead of a frigate, at a time when the full strength of the fleet was imperatively needed for the approach- ing struggle with Villeneuve.

His methods of disci- pline, it is true, were extraordinarily successful, but their success should be ascribed to his personal hold on the affections of his men and his constant regard for their welfare, rather than to strict adherence to the con- ventional code.

See also Hawthorne's criticism, quoted on p. Introduction 19 Early and late in his career Nelson assumed an inde- pendence of his superiors that was also unsanctioned by orthodox military standards.

Under Hughes in the West Indies, under Jervis at Cape St. Vincent, under Keith in the Mediterranean, and again at Copenhagen, he acted with such disregard of his instructions as could be carried off only by brilliant success.

In defeat, such conduct is insubordination; in victory, it is courageous assumption of responsibility.

In Nelson's case it ac- counts for his rapid rise to prominence and his selection for difficult tasks.

Again and again he put his fortunes to the hazard of a single bold stroke. That his ventures were so frequently successful must be attributed, not primarily to good luck, but to thorough preparation and skill in turning opportunities to advan- tage.

Nelson was keenly interested in the science of naval warfare and his mind was constantly at work on its problems. In the opinion of Admiral Mahan, though he was a less expert seaman than his friend Collingwood, and less a master of naval administration than Jervis, he was better than either in the actual conduct of a campaign.

Naval strategy — including all the phases of preparation for battle — and tactics — the movements in battle — were in Nelson's day less complicated and at the same time less generally understood than now.

It may be doubted whether the British admirals blockading the enemy fleets in the ports of France and Spain realized as clearly as historians have later realized how they were cooperat- ing to frustrate Napoleon's schemes for the invasion 20 Introduction of England and to bring about his final downfall.

What they did understand was that each had it as his task to watch, and if possible engage and destroy, that part of the enemy fleet to which he was assigned.

This was Nelson 's chief concern, and to it he gave pro- longed study. In his Mediterranean campaigns he was ordinarily opposed to an enemy equal or superior in material strength and close to its base of supplies.

To meet this superiority he could rely on, the better train- ing and seamanship of the British sailors, inured as they were to sea life by the long vigils of the blockade.

If opportunity offered, the fundamental principle of his tactics was to take the offensive, and concentrate in superior force against a part of the enemy, preventing the remainder, if possible, from giving aid.

The plan adopted at the Battle of the Nile, which illustrates this principle, was thoroughly worked out and understood by his captains before the attack.

And the manner in which, in this engagement. Nelson carried his ships straight into action, in spite of gathering darkness, without a delay until morning which might quite con- ceivably have been fatal to his chance of victory, illus- trates admirably his combination of thorough prepara- tion and prompt execution.

The plan employed at Trafalgar, similar but more elaborate, was under dis- cussion during the pursuit of Villenenve to the West Indies in the preceding winter, and was well formulated before Nelson's final departure from England to take command off Cadiz.

The long Toulon blockade, Introduction 21 from May, , to January, , during which count- less difficulties had to be met arising from inadequate supplies, need of repairs, and the necessity of keeping up the health and spirits of the men, was an achievement comparable in its kind to the victory of Trafalgar.

According to a report of the fleet physician in August, , the deaths on shipboard during the preceding two years, in a force of from six to eight thousand men, amounted to only one hundred ten, and the average number on the sick-list to about twenty-five per thou- sand — a record unprecedented at that time and remark- able today.

The French fleet was demoralized by the long voyage; Nelson's ships joined Cornwallis in the Channel, and Nelson himself, after less than a month in England, again hoisted his flag in the Victory.

In days when the very existence of England depended on her fleets. Nelson understood better than most of his contemporaries the need of pushing an engagement to decisive results.

Many of the commanders under whom he served in his earlier years were men of the old school, accustomed to the long-range fleet engagements of the eighteenth century, with conventions as strict as those of the code duello and consequences seldom more fatal.

Nelson rebelled against their half measures. Popular imagination is, after all, right in remem- bering him for his impetuosity and daring, and pictur- ing him as the commander who broke from the line without orders at Gape St.

Vincent, attacked a fleet protected by shoals and shore batteries at the Nile, pushed a reluctant superior officer to vigorous action at Copenhagen, and by seemingly rash and headlong onset destroyed a superior fleet at Trafalgar.

In neither his defects nor his virtues is Nelson the typical British man of action, or at least not the con- ventional ideal.

His petulance, vanity, and emotional- ism are more often associated with the Celtic or Latin temperaments, as are also his mental rapidity, alert- ness in crises, and power to inspire the unlimited devo- tion of his men.

Naval Academy, June 15, Warter, Southey's Life and Correspondence, ed. Cuthbert Southey, two vols. Atlantic Monthly, Jan.

A number of Southey's letters not previously published. Biographies : Life of Southey, by Edward Dowden, English Men of Letters Series, The best critical study of Southey's life and writings.

Bohert Southey ; the Story of His Life Written in His Letters, ed. John Dennis, Boston, , and published also in Bohn's Library, A carefully edited collection of the more important of Southey's letters.

Works : Southey's Poems, ed. Edward Dowden, Golden Treasury Series, Macmillan, A volume of selections with an excellent critical introduction. Poems by Eohert Southey, ed.

Fitzgerald, Oxford Univer- sity Press, Select Prose of Eohert Southey, ed. Brief personal recol- lections and criticism.

De Quincey's Literary Beminiscences. Chapters on Coleridge and on Wordsworth and Southey. Thackeray's Four Georges. Interesting sketch of Southey in George IV.

Macaulay's Literary Essays. Reviews of Southey's Colloquies on Society and Southey 's edition of Bunyan 's Pilgrim 's Prog- ress.

Essay on Southey. Saintsbury's History of Criticism, Vol. Ill, pp. See also his essay on Southey in Macmillan's Magazine, April, Nelson Biographical sources: Clarke and M 'Arthur's Life of Nelson, two vols.

A biography in which are inserted the more important of Nel- son's official reports and letters — the letters considerably al- tered and mutilated.

Nicolas 's Despatches and Letters of Lord Nelson, seven vols. A complete and well-edited collection. Nelson's Letters and Despatches, ed.

Laughton, one vol. Untrustworthy; written in the interest of Lady Hamilton from materials largely supplied by her.

Clark Eussell's Life of Nelson, Heroes of the Nations Series, Laughton 's Life of Nelson, English Men of Action Series, , and The Nelson Memorial, Admiral Mahan's Life of Nelson, two vols.

Additional references; James's Naval History, six vols. The best contemporary au- thority on Nelson's professional career.

Pettigrew 's Memoirs of the Life of Nelson, two vols. Admiral Mahan's Influence of Sea Power on the French Bevo- lution and Empire, two vols.

Clowes' History of the Eoyal Navy, vols. IV and V, Hobhouse's Nelson in England, London, Newbolt's The Year of Trafalgar, London, THE LIFE OF NELSON CHAPTER I Nelson 's Birth and Boyhood — He is entered on board the Eaison- nable — Goes to the West Indies in a Merchant-ship; then serves in the Triumph — He sails in Captain Phipp's Voyage of Discovery — Goes to the East Indies in the Seahorse, and returns in ill health — Serves as acting Lieutenant in the Worcester, and is made Lieuten- ant into the Lowestoffe, Commander into the Badger Brig, and Post into the HinchinbrooJc — Expedition against the Spanish Main — Sent to the North Seas in the Albemarle — Services during the American War.

Horatio, son of Edmund and Catherine Nelson, was born September 29, , in the parsonage-bouse of Burnham-Thorpe, a village in the county of Norfolk, of wbicb bis father was rector.

Nel- 1. Her father was a grandnephew of Sir John Suckling, poet, courtier, and soldier in the reign of Cliarles I.

Sir Rodert Walpole Leader of the Whig party and foremost figure in English politics during the reigns of George I and George II.

He is regarded as having been the first to exercise the powers of a modern prime minister. First Lord Walpole. Horatio, first Lord Walpole of Wolterton, was an elder brother of Sir Robert Walpole and a patron of Nelson's father.

Since the first lord died in , Nelson's godfather was pre- sumably the second Lord Walpole, of the same name, who was about thirty-five years of age at the time of Nelson's birth.

Neither the first nor the second Lord Walpole is to be confused with Sir Horace or Horatio Walpole of Strawberry Hill, the famous writer and anti- quarian, who was a son of Sir Robert.

Her brother, Captain Maurice Suckling, of the Navy, visited the widower upon this event, and promised to take care of one of the boys. Three years afterwards, when Horatio was only twelve years of age, being at home during the Christmas holidays, he read in the country newspaper that his uncle was appointed to the Raisonnahle, of sixty- four guns.

Accordingly Captain Suckling was written to. Sixty-four guns. In the eighteenth century the ships of the Brit- ish Navy were divided Into "rates," or classes, according to the number of guns they carried, as follows : first-rates carried from to guns mounted on three decks ; second-rates were ships of 98 or 90 guns ; third-rates were 80's, 74's, or 64's.

Vessels of 64 guns or more were called "ships-of-the-line," i. A frigate of Nelson's time was usually ship-rigged and carried about 24 guns mounted on the main deck and on raised decks fore and aft : she was used chiefly for scouting, carrying despatches, and.

A sloop-of-war the French corvette carried all her guns on the main deck. A city near Bristol in southwestern England, celebrated for Its mineral springs.

In the eighteenth century it reached the height of its popularity as a center of fashion and health resort. The Life of Nelson 27 i come, and the first time we go into action a cannon- ball may knock off his head, and provide for him at once.

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